Bad to the Bone: A New Slogan for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is officially dedicated to raising awareness of breast cancer.  Bright pink athletic gear, pink-tinted yogurt containers, and pink-lit buildings broadcast support for those living with breast cancer and those attempting to cure it.  As with any good campaign, there are also catchy slogans accompanying the pinking of our surroundings.  “Big or Small, Save Them All” is just one of the ditties designed to get us thinking about a disease that killed an estimated 40,000 persons last year.

Since being diagnosed with breast cancer almost four years ago, I’ve had a complicated relationship with popular ways of framing of the fight against breast cancer.  Leaving the critiques of the movement’s pink hew to others* I’m interested in how raising awareness has only just started to include information about the most aggressive forms of breast cancer and the stories that accompany them.

By now most of us know something about what I call the breast cancer drill: You find a lump in your breast; you get a mammogram, you’re told the awful news of having breast cancer; you suffer through the trauma of surgery, chemo, and radiation.  Then best case scenario you move into remission. 

This familiarity with the breast cancer drill was at the heart of my disorientation with my own breast cancer diagnosis.  My back broke—not once, but twice—and a biopsy on my back discovered I had . . . stage IV breast cancer? 

Come again?

I’m a woman with breast cancer.  The problem is that my path to diagnosis and treatment bears little resemblance to the breast cancer drill many of us know so well.  I found no lump; the mammograms I had revealed no tumor; I had no breast surgery, no chemo that led to loss of hair.  What does it mean to have breast cancer in a way that differs so drastically from the dominant breast cancer narrative?

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